Elisabeth Allerton Blog

Quartz

Posted by Elisabeth Dignan on

  Welcome to my new mineral series! This blog post is the first of a series of posts I'll be making, going in depth about some minerals you may see used in jewelry (and possibly some interesting ones that aren't used in jewelry as well). I make jewelry because I love gemstones, and hopefully this series will help spread the love!   Where better to start than quartz?     Quartz is a silicon dioxide (SiO2). It is a 7 on the Mohs scale of hardness. Its’ crystal system is trigonal, meaning it can form hexagonal (six-sided) prisms, but it doesn’t always....

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Opal

Posted by Elisabeth Dignan on

OPAL Opal is one of the most mysterious and treasured gems through all of history. In ancient Rome, it symbolized love and hope. The ancient Greeks believed opal would bestow upon its owners the gift of prophecy and would guard them from disease. Europeans have considered opal a symbol of hope, purity, and truth. The flashing color effect within some opal is called “play-of-color.” Opals with this optical phenomena are called “precious opals.” This effect is the result of the way silica spheres are arranged within the opal structure. “Common opal” is composed of amorphous hydrated silica, which makes it...

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About The Stones A - E

Posted by Elisabeth Dignan on

AFRICAN TURQUOISE Not turquoise at all, African “turquoise” is actually a type of jasper found in Africa. It is typically dyed to achieve the color that looks like traditional turquoise. The natural matrix is what helps it mimic turquoise so well. African turquoise jasper is harder on the Mohs scale than turquoise, making it a good substitute when the customer wants a less fragile, more affordable option. This stone is often sold simply as “African turquoise” which is a misleading misnomer and it should always be clarified that this stone is jasper.   AGATE Agate, like jasper, is a variety...

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Varieties of Quartz; Chalcedony, Geode, Jasper, Agate

Posted by Elisabeth Dignan on

QUARTZ Quartz is the second most abundant mineral in earth’s crust, and some well-known varieties include citrine, amethyst, and prasiolite. The word “quartz” comes from the Greek kruos, meaning “icy cold.” The Greeks believed quartz was a supercooled form of ice. It is used in many forms of technology due to its pyroelectric properties (it reacts to temperature change with positive or negative charges).   CHALCEDONY Chalcedony is a microcrystalline variety of the mineral quartz. It is translucent to opaque and can be almost any color, but naturally it is often white-to-blue, bluish-gray, or brown-to-black. Many well-known stones such as...

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About The Stones N - Q

Posted by Elisabeth Dignan on

OPAL Opal is one of the most mysterious and treasured gems through all of history. In ancient Rome, it symbolized love and hope. The ancient Greeks believed opal would bestow upon its owners the gift of prophecy and would guard them from disease. Europeans have considered opal a symbol of hope, purity, and truth. The flashing color effect within some opal is called “play-of-color.” Opals with this optical phenomena are called “precious opals.” This effect is the result of the way silica spheres are arranged within the opal structure. “Common opal” is composed of amorphous hydrated silica, which makes it...

Read more →